Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC

Dentist - West Hartford

18 N. Main Street, Suite 2  West Hartford, CT 06107

(860) 561-3050
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Suite 2
West Hartford, CT 06107

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Posts for: April, 2015

By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
April 24, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
NeilPatrickHarrisWhattheOscarsHostTreasuresMost

A few days before the Oscars, Vanity Fair magazine asked Academy Awards host Neil Patrick Harris to name his most treasured possession. Was it his Tony award statuette for best leading actor in a musical? His star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? The stethoscope he wore while playing teenaged doctor Doogie Howser on TV? No, as it turns out, the 41-year-old actor’s most treasured possession is… his wisdom teeth. Yes, you read that correctly. “Oddly, I still have my four wisdom teeth,” Harris said. “I refuse to let them go or I’ll lose my wise parts.”

How odd is it for a 41-year-old to have wisdom teeth? Actually, not that odd at all. While it is true that wisdom teeth are often removed, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to this. It all depends on whether they are causing problems now, or are likely to cause problems in the future.

The trouble wisdom teeth cause is related to the fact that they are the last molars to come in, and that molars are large in size. By the time wisdom teeth appear between the ages of 17 and 21, there often is not enough room for them in the jaw. Sometimes it’s because you may have inherited a jaw size that’s too small for your tooth size; and generally speaking, the size of the human jaw has evolved to become smaller over time.

If room is lacking, the adjacent molar (that came in earlier) can interfere with the path of eruption — causing the wisdom tooth to come in at an odd angle. The wisdom tooth can hit up against that other tooth, possibly causing pain or damaging the adjacent tooth. This is known as “impaction.” Sometimes the wisdom tooth breaks only partway through the gum tissue, leaving a space beneath the gum line that’s almost impossible to clean, causing infection. A serious oral infection can jeopardize the survival of teeth, and even spread to other parts of the body.

If a wisdom tooth is impacted, will you know it? Not necessarily. A tooth can be impacted without causing pain. But we can see the position of your wisdom teeth on a dental x-ray and help you make an informed decision as to whether they should stay or go. If removal is the best course of action, rest assured that this procedure is completely routine and that your comfort and safety is our highest priority. If there is no great risk to keeping them, as Neil Patrick Harris has done, we can simply continue to monitor their condition at your regular dental checkups. It will be particularly important to make sure you are reaching those teeth with your brush and floss, and that you keep to your schedule of regular professional cleanings at the dental office. All healthy teeth are indeed worth treasuring.

If you would like more information about wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Wisdom Teeth” and “Removing Wisdom Teeth.”


By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
April 23, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

Take care of your dental implants and they will take care of you for a lifetime.

You’ve probably heard many people say that dental implants are similar to natural teeth. While they do offer a major aesthetic Dental Implantsadvantage over other tooth replacement options, they still need a little TLC when it comes to at-home care. Your West Hartford dentist gives you the scoop on what taking care of your dental implants really entails.

Why is cleaning natural teeth and dental implants different?

While dental implants are meant to take the place of the missing tooth’s roots, they still don’t connect to the bone and gums the same way that a natural tooth does. You may need to change your oral regime a bit to accommodate your new teeth.

Why cleaning dental implants is important?

Keeping dental implants clean is just as important as it is for natural teeth. When you don’t clean your teeth often enough, plaque and bacteria will start to collect on your teeth and along the gumline. This same plaque will also build up on your dental implants each day. It’s vitally important that you brush your teeth at least twice a day. Better yet, aim to brush your teeth three times a day, or after every meal.

If plaque collects on your implant, an infection known as peri-implantitis can set in, which can cause you to lose it. So brush carefully and often!

How do I care for my dental implants?

Because dental implants are man-made, they are more prone to scratches than natural teeth. You may want to consider ultrasonic toothbrushes with soft bristles to minimize damage. Electronic brushes also offer the right amount of force and pressure to effectively clean your implant and the rest of your natural teeth.

You should also floss at least once a day, preferably before you brush. Dental implants are durable, so don’t worry about really getting in between your teeth for a thorough cleaning each day.

No matter how meticulous you are when it comes to caring for your dental implant, you still need to see your West Hartford dentist routinely for cleanings, maintenance and exams. This is the only way to tell that your implant is still healthy. If it’s time for your upcoming dental cleaning call the dental office of Drs. Bradbury & Amato today.


By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
April 09, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   toothache  
FiveFactsAboutToothachesinChildren

When it comes to childhood injuries — cuts and scrapes, growing pains, even wounded pride — it's often a parent's job to try and make things better. But sometimes it's hard to know whether the hurt indicates a serious problem, or if it's a situation that will resolve itself as soon as the sun comes up. If pain is being caused by a toothache, here are some general rules that can help you figure out what's the best thing to do.

1. Unless it's accompanied by fever and swelling, a child's toothache isn't generally an emergency.

The first thing to do is calm down (both you and the child) — and talk! Find out exactly where the pain comes from, and when and why it might have started. (Your child may have forgotten to tell you about that fall in the gym...) Sometimes, a little sleuthing will give you a clue about what's causing the pain.

2. Tooth decay, a bacteria-induced infection, is the most common cause of toothaches.

Check the teeth for brown spots or tiny holes (cavities) which might indicate decay — especially on the biting surfaces and in the areas between teeth. Next, look at the gums around the hurt tooth. If they show cuts or bruises, that's a sign of trauma. If you see only swelling, it may indicate the formation of an abscess.

3. If nothing looks obviously wrong, try gently flossing both sides of the tooth.

This may dislodge a bit of trapped food or candy, and relieve the pressure and soreness. But if that doesn't help, remember that some conditions — like nerve damage inside the tooth, for example — may have no apparent symptoms except pain.

4. Treat pain with an appropriate dose of acetaminophen or ibuprofen.

Base the dose on your child's age and weight, according to the medication's instructions. You can also apply an ice pack (one minute on, one minute off) to the outside of the jaw. But NEVER rub aspirin (or any painkiller) directly on a child's gums: It can cause burns and severe discomfort.

5. Pain that keeps a child awake at night, or persists into the next day, needs professional evaluation as soon as possible.

Otherwise, unless the pain resolves quickly and you're sure you know exactly what caused the toothache, it's best to bring your child in for an examination as soon as it's practical. You'll feel better having a dental professional, backed with years of experience and training, taking care of your child's health — and you just might prevent a future problem.

If you have questions about toothaches in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Child's Toothache.”