Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC

Dentist - West Hartford

18 N. Main Street, Suite 2  West Hartford, CT 06107

(860) 561-3050
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West Hartford, CT 06107

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Posts for tag: root canal

By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
August 28, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Recently, dental patients were surveyed about their most-feared dental procedure. It was found that 60 percent of the respondents were more apprehensive about getting a root canal than having a tooth pulled. Those who harbor that fear typically haven't actually had a Root Canalroot canal; most people's opinions are based on exaggerations about old, outdated treatments. Dr. Robert Bradbury and Dr. Anthony Amato, your West Hartford, Connecticut dentists, want to educate their patients about the reality of root canals. Root canals are helpful, therapeutic procedures that eliminate pain and save tooth function.

Why do I need a root canal?

Root canals are performed at your West Hartford dentist's office to remove the inner tissues of a tooth that have been damaged by an infection. Damage from decay or trauma can cause the infection to develop, and root canals save the tooth by stopping the infection at the source. Once the nerves and tissue are removed, the pain associated with the infection is eliminated.

What does a root canal feel like?

Perhaps because of the invasive nature of the procedure, many people believe root canals cause extreme pain. For almost all patients, the opposite is true. Very often, the pain exists before the root canal is even scheduled. There is usually quite a bit of discomfort associated with the untreated infection inside the tooth. Abscesses can form along the gums and in advanced cases, the infection can spread into the jawbone or other areas of the body.

It may help to know that many patients compare having a root canal to having a cavity filled. Your West Hartford dentist will use local anesthesia to numb the area and then use a hand-held mechanism to clean out the inside of the tooth. A durable organic material will be used to fill in the resulting space, and the outside of your tooth will be fitted with a temporary crown. These are later replaced with a permanent crown by your West Hartford dentist. 

Thanks to anesthesia and removal of the nerves, root canals are practically painless and healing is relatively quick. Patients of Drs. Bradbury and Amato who still have some reservations can be given a mild sedative before the work begins. 

If you've had a toothache and think you might need a root canal, don't delay in contacting Drs. Bradbury & Amato in West Hartford, Connecticut. Early treatment means a quicker recovery, and you'll likely join the majority of patients who find that root canals are a simple procedure once they've learned the facts.

By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
February 13, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal   dental injuries  
SevereDentalInjuriesMayRequireEndodonticTreatment

If you regularly participate in sports or other physical activity, you’re at a higher risk for dental injuries. While chipped teeth are the most common result of these injuries, a few may result in more serious trauma — dislodged, cracked or knocked out teeth. In these cases, the core of the tooth — the pulp — and the root may have been damaged. Saving the tooth may require endodontic treatment and possibly the expertise of a specialist in the field, an endodontist.

Endodontics, from the Greek words for “within” and “tooth,” is a specialty of dentistry that treats disease or damage affecting the inner parts of a tooth, particularly the pulp chamber, the root canals, and the root. While all dentists are trained in endodontic procedures, an endodontist has advanced training, experience and specialized equipment to address complex cases.

The type of endodontic treatment needed for an injured tooth will depend on the extent of damage. A mature, permanent tooth with pulp damage, for example, may require a root canal treatment. In this procedure the pulp chamber and root canals are thoroughly cleaned out, and then are filled with a special filling to prevent any future infection. Later the tooth should be crowned to permanently seal it. Although a general dentist may perform a root canal, more complex cases, such as a tooth with an extensive root canal network, may need to be performed by an endodontist using microscopic equipment.

A tooth that has undergone severe trauma, especially a knocked out tooth, will need extensive follow-up care by a general dentist and possibly an endodontist to improve its chances of long-term survival. Because of the severity, the tooth may lose viability and the body ultimately may begin to reject it. For this reason, the tooth should be monitored on a regular basis and may need further treatment from time to time, even up to five years after the injury.

One final word: if you participate in sports or exercise activity, you can significantly reduce your risk of dental injury with a mouthguard. There are various types, but the best protection is one custom designed to fit the specific contours of your mouth. We’ll be glad to advise you further on how to protect your teeth from injury.

If you would like more information on dental injury prevention and treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth.”

By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
August 15, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
KellyClarksonGetstotheRootoftheProblem

Now that celebrities can communicate directly with their fans through social media, we’ve started to see dispatches from some surprising locations — the dental chair, for example! Take singer Kelly Clarkson, who was the first winner of American Idol, and perhaps one of the first to seek moral support via social media before having an emergency root canal procedure.

“Emergency root canal — I’ve had better days,” Kelly posted on her Facebook page, along with a photo of herself looking… well, pretty nervous. But is a root canal procedure really something to be scared about? It’s time to clear up some misconceptions about this very common dental procedure.

First of all, root canal treatment is done to save a tooth that might otherwise be lost to an infection deep inside it. So while it’s often looked upon with apprehension, it’s a very positive step to take if you want to keep your teeth as long as possible. Secondly, tooth infections can be painful — but it’s the root canal procedure that stops the pain. What, actually, is done during this tooth-saving treatment?

First, a local anesthetic is administered to keep you from feeling any pain. Then, a small opening is made through the chewing surface of the infected tooth, giving access to the central space inside, which is called the “pulp chamber.” A set of tiny instruments is used to remove the diseased pulp (nerve) tissue in the chamber, and to clean out the root canals: branching tunnel-like spaces that run from the pulp chamber through the root (or roots) of the tooth. The cleared canals are then filled and sealed.

At a later appointment, we will give you a more permanent filling or, more likely, a crown, to restore your tooth’s full function and protect it from further injury. A tooth that has had a root canal followed by a proper restoration can last as long as any other natural tooth — a very long time indeed.

If you have any questions about root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step by Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Drs Bradbury & Amato, PC
March 18, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
Top5ReasonsNottoDelayGettingaRootCanal

So you came in to the dental office for an exam, and now you’ve been told you need a root canal. But you’re wondering: Do I really have to do this? I’ve heard all sorts of things about the procedure. What if I wait a while — would that be so bad?

The answer is: It just might! Whenever we dentists recommend a root canal procedure, we have good reasons for doing so. Here are the top five reasons why you shouldn’t delay getting this important treatment.

  1. The tooth is infected and dying; a root canal stops the infection. While the outer layers of the tooth are hard, the inner pulp is made of soft, living tissue. This tissue sometimes becomes infected (through deep decay, cracks in the tooth surface, etc.), and begins to die. Once that happens, treatment is needed right away — to stop the pain, control the infection, and keep it from spreading.
  2. Root Canal Treatment Alleviates Pain. That’s right: Root canal treatment doesn’t cause pain — it relieves it. The procedure is relatively painless, despite the old stories you might have heard. In fact, it’s not unlike having a cavity treated, though it may take a little longer. So if you’re experiencing tooth pain (a major symptom in most cases of root canal trouble), remember that the sooner you get it treated, the sooner you’ll be pain-free.
  3. It won’t get better on its own… If you ignore some things, they will go away. Root canal problems aren’t one of those things. In some cases, if you wait long enough, the pain will go away. But that’s not a good sign, because the problem won’t go away on its own; it simply means that the nerves inside the tooth are all dead. The infection continues to smolder like glowing coals in a fire.
  4. …But it could get worse. Left untreated, bacteria from the infected tooth pulp can travel through the roots of the tooth and into the tissue of the gums and jaw. That can cause a painful, pus-filled abscess to form, which will require urgent treatment. In extreme cases, It can also result in increasing systemic (whole-body) inflammation, potentially putting you at risk for more serious conditions, like heart disease and stroke.
  5. Root Canal Treatment Can Save the Tooth. If you neglect treatment of a root canal problem long enough, you’re at serious risk for losing the infected tooth. And tooth loss, once it starts, can bring on a host of other problems — like an increased risk of tooth decay on remaining teeth, as well as gum disease, bite problems… and, as oral health problems escalate, even more tooth loss. Why put yourself at risk?

If you would like more information about root canal treatment, call our office for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “A Step-By-Step Guide To Root Canal Treatment” and “Tooth Pain? Don’t Wait!